The Unspeakable – bookscover2cover

 
Another story of mine has been posted at bookscover2cover. This one is called The Unspeakable and can be read by clicking on the link. This story was inspired by a couple of famous quotes by the story’s protagonists –

‘The unspeakable in full pursuit of the uneatable’ – Oscar Wilde

‘The love that dare not speak its name’  – Lord Alfred Douglas (Bosie)

A little wordplay links the two quotes, while the reality/metaphor of fox hunting colours the whole scene. So here, to provide a suitable finish, is Julian Cope –
 

Las Vegas Widow – bookscover2cover

 
Another story of mine has been posted at bookscover2cover. This one is called Las Vegas Widow and can be read by clicking on the link. The story was written last year, after I’d been participating in writing prompts for a while and had enjoyed visiting numerous posts in which shady male characters got their just deserts. I thought that Sue Blake should have a story like that – plus I felt like writing about a lion tamer, as you do…

To finish, here’s a song by Gram Parsons –
 

What Sparks –  bookscover2cover

gladday

Another story of mine has been posted at bookscover2cover. This one is called What Sparks and can be read by clicking on the link. It was written as a celebration of William Blake, who gave me half of my pen-name and was ever so good. His picture “Glad Day” begins this post.

The story has its basis in the following incident, which I quote from  Wikipedia:

At the age of eight or ten in Peckham Rye, London, Blake claimed to have seen “a tree filled with angels, bright angelic wings bespangling every bough like stars.” According to Blake’s Victorian biographer Gilchrist, he returned home and reported the vision and only escaped being thrashed by his father for telling a lie through the intervention of his mother.

To finish, here’s a song from the person who provided, by circuitous routes, the other half of my name, Johnny Cash. And, as a special bonus, let’s add some Joni Mitchell too –
 

After the Nivelle Offensive –   bookscover2cover

 
Another story of mine has been posted at bookscover2cover. This one is called After the Nivelle Offensive and can be read by clicking on the link.

The story was written last year, 100 years after the outbreak of World War 1, and the historical background, courtesy of Wikipedia, is as follows –

The Nivelle Offensive in April 1917 was a Franco-British offensive on the Western Front in the First World War. The French part of the offensive was intended to be strategically decisive, by breaking through the German defences on the Aisne within 48 hours, with casualties expected to be around 10,000 men.

The operation had been planned as a decisive blow to the Germans; by 20 April it was clear that the strategic intent of the offensive had not been achieved. By 25 April most of the fighting had ended. On 3 May the French 2nd Division refused to follow its orders to attack and this mutiny soon spread throughout the army.

In 1919 Pierrefeu gave French casualties from 16–25 April as 118,000 of whom 28,000 were killed, 5,000 died of wounds, 80,000 were wounded, 20,000 of whom were fit to return to their units by 30 April and 5,000 were taken prisoner. In 1920 Hayes wrote that British casualties were 160,000 and Russian casualties 5,183 men.

Nivelle was sacked as French Commander-in-Chief and moved to North Africa. He was replaced by the considerably more cautious Pétain with Foch as chief of the General Staff; the new commanders abandoned the strategy of decisive battle to one of recuperation and defence, to avoid high casualties and to restore morale. Pétain had 40–62 mutineers shot as examples.