The Deep Green Gaze

 

the deep green gaze

deepens while a still white gull

teardrops the lake

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This poem was written in response to Carpe Diem #806 Lake Victoria, another great prompt from Chèvrefeuille at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai. All of the poems in the link-up can be read here. And, to finish, here’s Phoebe Jevtovic Rosquist & David Tayler, performing Philip K. Dick’s favourite song (now that’s one hell of an axe!)  –
 

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Lazily

 

lazily I tread

the soft grass and a summer moth

treads the soft air

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This poem was written in response to Carpe Diem Modern Times Haiku #2 Margaret Chula’s “following my footprints”, another great prompt from Chèvrefeuille at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai. All of the poems in the link-up can be read here. And, to finish, here’s Kurt Vile –
 

bookscover2cover – Scrying

 
Another story of mine has been posted at bookscover2cover; called Scryingit can be read by clicking on the link. This story was written because ‘scrying’ is a nice word and because the future is so easy to predict that it’s a wonder all those charlatans can still make a decent living – you want to know what’s in store just look at the old people around you.

And to finish, here’s Benny Spellman  

 

Electric

 

electric blue

the sky drops a thin shard

onto green grass – dragonfly

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This poem was written in response to Carpe Diem Utabukuro #7 a drop of water by Cor van den Heuvel, another great prompt from Chèvrefeuille at Carpe Diem Haiku Kai. In this post I used the poem chosen by Chèvrefeuille as an inspiration:

a drop of water
floats by the canoe
on a curled leaf

© Cor van den Heuvel

What I like about this haiku is how it paints a scene but then plays with the reader’s expectations: the canoe should float on the water but here the water floats by the canoe, not only that but when I visualise that drop of water on the leaf it seems to be mimicking the appearance of a person sat in their canoe. “Surprise” is one of the classic elements of haiku and this poem is a subtle example of the technique.

All of the poems in the link-up can be read here. And, to finish, here’s The Primitives –